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Lake Winnipeg is Dying


          We have been lucky to enjoy my in-law’s cottage at Hillside Beach on Lake Winnipeg for twenty years. They’ve been enjoying it for even longer, but times, they are a-changin’. If you’re not a Manitoban, then maybe you don’t know this, but Lake Winnipeg is one of Canada’s largest fresh water lakes after the Greats! It also has some unique properties such as being shallow and sandy, and having a very large watershed area. This watershed brings in all kinds of contaminants and over time, the algae population in the lake has had massive growth. All of this means that our beach becomes un-swimmable – and sometimes so thick with green, stinky algae – not even safe to paddle a kayak in. The diminishing health of our beach has made cottage-going somewhat less appealing, which made us daydream of a cleaner lake. We even talked from time to time, about moving home to our rural roots near beautiful Riding Mountain National Park, where the aptly named Clear Lake is nestled. However, we enjoy the amenities of the city and the opportunities a larger centre affords our kids: French Immersion School, for example. With the kernel of these ideals, we browsed Canadian cities.


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